Big Pots, Shellac Resist, and the Flu

Why did I make big pots the first day of the flu?  Well I knew I was only going to get sicker, so while I could, I made ten little pitchers, five large urns for resist work, and three other large urns.  The second day of the flu I made lids, and slept. The third day I trimmed all the pots, and slept.  The fourth day I slept, trimmed lids, joined knobs, and carved urns.  The remaining ten days I’ve slept, carved urns, took photo’s and slept…  and vowed to get a flu shot next year!

Here are some nice shots of the urns in process.  It’s a very long process, between the throwing, trimming, and carving the feet and rim.  Once the pot dries completely liquid wax resist is brushed on to create the floral pattern.  (This process is known as shellac resist or hydro abrasion).  Then comes the long process of rubbing away the clay with a sponge, (which I thought would be a nice sitting down job while not having much energy).  Where there is no resist the clay slowly gets etched away.

willow watching tall urns freshly thrown

Just finished carving_lucy fagella Tall Urns Drying_Lucy Fagella

The carving process_lucy fagella details_lucy fagella Large Urns Drying_lucy fagella

Here is a finished mini version of the large urn… a little keepsake in my son Andrew’s hands. To see more of these and other urns visit my website and or LuciaUrns on etsy.

White on White Petite Keepsake_Lucy Fagella 

If you want to see a nice little video on this method, check out Ron Philbeck  , “Hydro Abrasion”  He explains it very well!  http://youtu.be/d_HHrNdPGIk

 

What About White on White Pottery?

So I’ve written on my blog about blue pots selling well.  Now I want to talk about white pots not selling well.  This pasta bowl pictured below has sat in my studio for about three years.  It is so subtle… white on white glazing, with hints of pinks and greens… so, so subtle. This and other white on white pots just do not sell for me.  Well, last week I was about to put it on my discontinued shelf and sell it for half the price, but could not bring myself to do it, I just figured it will serve the family better in the kitchen rather than giving it away!

I remember being at a show many years ago with Andy Shaw.  People were just walking past his booth, it was filled with white on white pattern pots.  (If you have never seen Andy’s pots take a look at his website, he does gorgeous work!) Well I suggested to Andy to get some color like an apple or something.  He went to a local store and picked up tomatoes.  He put them in some of the pots, and the next day people were stopping at his booth! What is it about color that draws people right in?

I think maybe white on white requires too much work from the customer.  They have to take the time, come up close, pick up the pot, patiently examine it.  Where as the blue pot, shouts here I am, look at me!  Yet when you bring that white pot home, your food tends to look a lot better than it does in the blue pot.  Sometimes I think the only people who truly understand white on white pottery are chefs, and potters! 

So here is my beautiful white on white bowl, in my kitchen, with my lunch in it!  I’m enjoying it!